Hello, please LOGIN  
If new to Scutwork, please REGISTER first

 
HOMEADD A PROGRAMMODIFY A PROGRAMNEW PROGRAMSPOPULAR PROGRAMSTOP RATEDNEWSLETTERHELP

More search options


REVIEW LIST

Review Summary

100% Times: 0 Times: 0 Times: 0 Times: 10 Times: 4
80%
60%
40%
20%
0%
Times  0 0 0 10 4
Rating  1 2 3 4 5

Add your own Review!

 
Pages: 1 2 3 [>] [>>]
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful:

PGY3 Overall Rating: 19-Dec- 2012
Teaching: Atmosphere: Research:

Schedule

Floor months: 630:5
Electives 8-5
VAcations 3 weeks/year
On call every 4 days on floor months
VERY BUSY...No Downtime while on floor.

Teaching

Good teaching, regular didactics, Good teachers

Atmosphere

Life outside hospital: Definitely possible and is there and available. Its the floor months which were pain..

Conclusion

PRograms cherrypicks most of the residents from small foreign countries with well known Universities, hence the quality of residents is exceptional. thats what drives the program, but dont get me wrong..staff is great as well. Great teaching! Internal Medicine academic staff is one of the best.. Drawbacks: Clerical and ancillary support is horrible! For example. I filled out every MRI screening form on pts I needed MRI on. Had to FAx things on own...Clerks are really a pain to deal with. Had to call to make appointments for patients. Forms Forms and Forms.... Once finishes, I was ready for the world! I will probably not chose the program again..because of work load..Its heavy...For almost two years I admitted up to 20 patients in one night as there ws no cap system...Even when cap was introduced, the program is designed in such a way, that you will cap every time...Smart chiefs..That added to filling out mri forms and faxing forms and making sure they have received it by calling them...? No more! Nurses are really incompetent and clerks -- are rude, lazy and incompetent... Almost every one gets a fellowship--as this program is despite its faults is a strong program.


Was this review helpful to you?    
1 of 44 people found the following review helpful:

Intern Overall Rating: 30-Sep- 2008
Teaching: Atmosphere: Research:

Schedule

Tipical day during floor rotation: I wake up at 5 am to be in the hospital at 6 am. This is because I take some extra time to eat a good breakfast. I usually finish my progress notes before rounds. Rounds start between 8 or 8:30 am, senior staff always listen to your assessment and discuss plan with you. There is always time for teaching during rounds, specially when this is discussed with the staff at the begining of the rotation. During rounds or after finishing them, you make orders for your patients and arrange for consults if necessary. Time for procedures as well, when needed. Rounds finish around 10:30 or 11:00. Mos tof the paperwork is about orders and updating discharge summaries of the patients. Busy floors you can get new patients every day and you discharge a lot as well. Average for a busy floor is 6 patients. Some people told me 8 patients for 2-intern teams in other floors.
Anyway, schedule is fine for the first year, when you are supposed to spend a lot of time in the hospital. It is always better to have sevral patients, that way you learn!
Hospital respects the 80 hour thing, noon conference everyday with food provided 90% of the time.

Teaching

The attending staff at Henry Ford is excellent and dedicated to teaching. Rounds typically last two and a half to three hours (depending on the number of patients on the service)and a majority of this time is spent teaching. Best way to learn during the internship is BEDSIDE!! There are general medical and subspeciality floors which allows you to see different kinds of patients, different problems, gives you a strong basis in internal medicine. There is daily noon conference (1 hour, for case reports, clinical pathologic correlation, clinical decision making, M&M, interactive lecture, intern survival series, and Grand Rounds).

Atmosphere

If you get a car early, you're safe. Otherwise you will depend on other people to go out. This is not manhattan or chicago guys! no subway! However, with a car you are safe and can go to different places. Summer is great, good weather, outside activities, etc. You get the chance to make good friends during the internship. You can be friends with your senior residents. A lot of people willing to help out, including chief residents and senior staff. They really care about you! Lots of IMGs.

Conclusion

My conclusion: I am really happy with the program. I am sure I will learn so much. The only thing is the cold weather during the winter and that it took me some time to get a car. Anyway, Come visit! Apply soon! You are very welcome!


Was this review helpful to you?    
1 of 39 people found the following review helpful:

Intern Overall Rating: 30-Sep- 2008
Teaching: Atmosphere: Research:

Schedule

You are on call every 4 days, the call end at 10:00 o'clock in regular days, end at 6:00 on Sunday and it is over night on Friday and Saturday, you should be in the hospital before 6:30 am and leave by 5:00. The workload depend the floor and on the number of resident (3 or 4), you have 2-3 elective months in the 1st year, I did the radiology month it is very easy and it depend on how much you want to learn during this month .

Teaching

We do teaching rounds with the staff every days, many days we have seminars and every days we have noon conference. everyone have one day every week in the clinic ,we assigned modules to read , we have full access to all core medical journals, up to date........

Atmosphere

the atmosphere here is very friendly , they will help you a lot in the beginning , we have a lot of IMG's in the programs from many different countries , I don’t know the percentage probably>50%, actually 1st 1-2 months are the hardest the you get used to the system and start enjoying your life

Conclusion

I am very satisfied being here in Henry Ford Health system , some would consider it a drawback to be in area that has a relatively high crime rate , our hospital campus is very safe and you get more experience in dealing with more challenging patients


Was this review helpful to you?    
0 of 33 people found the following review helpful:

PGY2 Overall Rating: 28-Aug- 2008
Teaching: Atmosphere: Research:

Schedule

The schedule varies depending on the level of training. Our program is strictly compliant with the 80 hour rule.
During the internship year, we have 8 inpatient months. On these months, we have to present not later that 6:30 to be able to see our patients, or any new patients admitted overnight by our night float. A day typically ends at no later than 5 pm, unless we're on cal. Calls are til 10 pm on weekdays, where the night float picks up the service. On friday and saturday, the calls are overnight, and on sunday, calls as interns end at 6 to 6:30 pm. Because of the ight float system that covers all floors except the intensive care units, we rarely work 80 hours a week, and actually would average 70 per week..
During the elective months, there are no calls, unless we are on back up and are called to cover for a resident who could not present to work for health related issues.
The second year is when we do most of our MICU months, but also many electives. The third year could include a month of MICU if we only did two during the second year, otherwise it consists of floor supervision and electives.

Teaching

Faculty members are great, approachable and always available to help and guide us. And I would rate the teaching as excellent. We have the opportunity to interact directy with faculty members, be it on electives, in the clinic or during inpatient rotations. We have the right balance, managing the patients as a team of residents, with the rounding staff (internal medicine on medicine floors or specialty staff on our specialty rotation) discussing the cases during daily teaching rounds. Didactics happen daily, at noon where we have a conference. Lunch is provided during all of these lectures. Weekly grand rounds with guest expert speakers and monthly journal clubs are also on the curriculum. We also have weekly continuity clinic where we are exposed to the outpatient population. I can say that the level of exposure is excellent; we have one of the largest MICU of the country, and we are part of a large medical group serving a population of different socieconomic background. We therefore see the disease in their entire spectrum. I have not finished my residency yet but I can be assured that by the end of my trainig, I will be comfortable managing most of the cases that I will see.

Atmosphere

The atmosphere is great! So far residents have interacted very well with each other. We have residents from different backgrounds: USA, Latin America, the middle east, India. Bonding quickly but cultural exchange too. At the same time, our faculty memebers are very approachable. We have a resident advocacy committee, a team of residents elected by their peer, whoo meet monthly with the chief residents as well as the progam director. Those meetings are a time when we can discuss any subjecs that the residents feel needs to be addressd by the faculty, and also a time to plan social events. We have various social events planned around the year that faculty members attend, like a welcome lunch to the new interns, a summer picnic, a new year/holidays party in december, as well as the graduation party. Furthermore, residents often plan social gatherings, karaoke nights, dinners and nights out. These social activities srengthen the camaraderie among us. The key to having a life outside of residency is time management. Being efficient, you will have the time to attend to your trainig responsibilites (doing research, presenting to your duties, etc..) as well as having a life outside of residency. I have been able to manage my life outside of work even during my internship year. There is a gym close to the hospital for those who like to work out, most residents join as the price is very affordable. Residency is no vacation, and there is not way for it to be so, but I as well as my colleagues and friends have been able to maintain that balance between work duties and personal life.

Conclusion

I can say that our program allows us to be confident and solid physicians. It provides a great training for people who want to pursue a career in primary care, as well as the ones among us who like to further specialize. We actually are exposed to all the subspecialty fields during our inpatient as well as elective rotations. Many of us like to actually stay for our fellowships at Henry Ford, and people who want to discover new horizons have no problems matching in their desired specialties. Depending on their interest, some have joined private practices, others have joined academic institutions and some even stay as faculty members at Henry Ford!! I have not finished my training yet, but I am pretty confident that I will be ready and well prepared at the end of my residency. I would definitely chose our program again if I had to reapply.


Was this review helpful to you?    
9 of 43 people found the following review helpful:

Recent Residency Graduate Overall Rating: 19-Apr- 2007
Teaching: Atmosphere: Research:

Schedule

Compliant with the ACGME 80 hour rule. (The program director was one of the leaders involved in the approval of this mandate at a national level). The schedules are variable. In electives and in clinic days the day starts at 8:00 AM and ends at 5:00 PM in most cases. Interns and residents have 2 – 3 backup calls per elective month. This is in case someone calls sick or travels on short notice. Second and third year residents take an additional “guest call” while on Fridays so that other residents who are on call don’t break their admission caps.

In inpatient months the day starts at 6 or 6:30 for interns, depending on their load of patients. Interns write progress notes, med orders and discharge summaries. Senior residents (usually PGY3) should be there no later than 6:30 to relieve the night float residents and distribute the overnight admissions. However, most senior residents arrive by 6:45 to 7:00. Other responsibilities include helping interns with questions or difficult patients, personally evaluating patients in the ward and agree upon the assessment and plan with interns before rounds. Rounds with the senior staff start at 8:00 AM and should be finished by 11:00AM in order to allow the team time to complete work with patients and time to attend the didactic lectures. Days usually end by 5:00PM if you are not on call. Calls are Q4 and these end by 8:00PM Monday through Thursday. There is a sign out process that is both oral and written to the night float in every floor. Most people leave by 9:00 PM, after they complete their work. Friday and Saturday calls are overnight and the day ends until work is finished (usually by noon next day). There are no calls on Sundays; people are usually done by noon. Scutwork is limited to paperwork and phone calls. Phlebotomists, transportation services, rapid response team for sick patients are available 24/7.

Night float is a one month rotation for 2nd and 3rd year residents only. Monday through Thursday, work starts at 8:00 PM with the intern and senior resident sign outs, as well as the transfer of the on call beeper and cell phone. Cross coverage and admissions are performed in a single geographical area (this is a plus!). Sometimes you may help a fellow night float with simultaneous admissions or several sick patients. You stop taking admissions at 6:30AM. However, you stay to finish your work and present your admissions to the attending until 9:00 AM. Fridays and Saturdays are off. Sundays are very long because you have to be in house at 7:00 am to take admissions and cross cover until Monday at 9:00 AM.

MICU months are reserved mostly for 2nd years and some 3rd years. Call is Q4 and every call is overnight. There is no night float for the ICUs. The days start at 6:00 or 6:30 AM and usually end by 4:00 PM. On call you stay overnight. Staff does a good job in rounding with the post-call resident patients first, unless there are other unstable patients. You are done before 12:00 post call. Pulmonary fellows are in house 24/7 in case you need backup. Interns and 2nd year residents do CICU. The schedules are almost identical but patients are usually easier.

Summarizing, the program is compliant with the ACGME 80 hour rule. Interns have 8 inpatient months including CICU, 2 “mandatory electives” (geriatrics & clinical skills), 1-2 real electives and one month block of vacation or 3 weeks of vacation. 2nd years have 3-4 ICU months, night float, ER and electives. 3rd years have night float, 6 months supervision and electives.

Teaching

Outstanding! Faculty is very good in general. You round in medical subspecialty inpatient wards. Diagnostics and therapeutics are learned directly from the attending subspecialists. There are inpatient wards in pulmonary, cardiology/telemetry, nephrology, ID, heme/onc and naturally GIM. All of the patients are teaching patients because of Henry Ford Hospital’s nature as “closed multispecialty medical group”. This allows plenty of teaching and autonomy in most cases. Naturally, there are few attendings who like to micromanage. In general fellow interns and residents are well prepared and the progression in knowledge and experience is noticeable with every year of training. Teaching in the ICU’s is also outstanding. The learning in the continuity clinics is average. Environment is busy and little time is left for discussion in most cases. Patients have multiple medical problems, many of them with dysfunctional personal and social situations. There is a very good quality mandatory outpatient reading curriculum: the “John’s Hopkins Modules”. Noon lectures and resident report are Monday through Friday from 12:00 to 2:00 PM. The quality of the lectures and the discussion is usually average. Unfortunately, there is very little participation of senior staff physicians who appear to be much more concerned in patient care (keeping up with their RVU’s) or in administrative meetings. The elective months are usually great. There is a posted reading list for most electives in the HFH intranet. The hospital has pretty much every single specialty and subspecialty in medicine. Most IM fellowships are also available with the exception of rheumatology. The quality of the fellowship programs is generally very good. Finally, research is widely available and encouraged. Residents have to be very motivated and sometimes insisting with certain staff. Clinical obligations take priority in most cases and protected research time may be sometimes difficult to obtain. Most of the research is clinical or epidemiological. There are also some basic research opportunities available.

Atmosphere

Despite being a large residency program camaraderie is good. Residents bond very well with other residents in their respective year of training. PGY1s and PGY3s also meet each other. PGY2 are sort of isolated in the ICU’s or in electives. There are few events that gather most residents: the welcome picnic, the Christmas party and the graduation party. About 80% are IMG’s from various backgrounds: Middle East, India / Pakistan, South America, especially Peruvian, and less frequently Asian and African. Most American grads come from Wayne State or Michigan State. 99% of the residents are easy going and have a life outside of work (especially 2nd and 3rd years).

Conclusion

In conclusion this is an excellent IM program for people interested in clinical IM with a strong suit in inpatient care. This program is also very good for those looking for a fellowship; at least 75% of the people I met got the fellowship of their choice. You should also be a self-directed learner; if you are looking to be held by the hand all the time, look for a smaller program. The program is a little above average for those pursuing academic or outpatient focused careers. If your focus is research, then look for an academically focused university based program. You should also be willing to work with IMG's. I feel that Henry Ford gave me a very solid preparation in internal medicine. The skills learned in residency are not only limited to knowledge and experience but also to integrity, humanism and self-directed learning that should continue for as long as I breath. Please feel free to contact me with any questions or concerns.


Was this review helpful to you?    
Pages: 1 2 3 [>] [>>]

Copyright © 2000-2013 Scutwork, Inc. All rights reserved. Scutwork.com and the Scutwork.com logo are trademarks of Scutwork, Inc.
Last Update: 22-Aug- 2014 at 12:36:44

•  CONTACT US   •   ABOUT US   •   ADVERTISE   •  DISCLAIMER  •