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3 of 32 people found the following review helpful:

PGY5 Overall Rating: 02-Jan- 2008
Teaching: Atmosphere: Research:

Schedule

Schedule is highly variable - I enjoyed this because it allowed me to feel tested and to learn skills of dealing with high volume or complications and then to have other times when I could relax, goof off or be with my family. Elective months and non-service months are what you make of them - often they are 40 hour a week schedules with lot's of self organized time. This is 2 or 3 months of first year and more than half of second and 3rd year schedules. During the service months especially med-service the schedule is very tight right on the 80 hour rule with q 4 call. Sometimes OB can even have q3 call with anywhere from 1 to 7 deliveries a day. The workload also varies I've had killer hard months with 9-15 patients a day on med service and relatively quite months with only 4. The program helps by redistributing patients if an individual has more than he or she can safely handel.

Teaching

The Faculty are great! There are very different teaching styles and a great sense of family and connectedness. I think your should look for this anywhere you go. It makes a great experience. Teaching is all the time - as an unopposed residency we have the opportunity to work as much as we want to get more education on our off-service months like the subspecialties and surgery. there are didacticsessions at noon conferences daily but there is some discussion of changing that arrangement.

Atmosphere

In the hospital there is no class system between the doctors as ive noticed in larger institutions. Residents are treated with respect like any other doctors. And the various subspecialists having no residents in thier own fields enjoy teaching when someone is interested. otherwise we can get to know each other in the doctor's lounge. I made good friends among my teachers and the other docs in Anderson. Though I graduated in 2006 and moved away I still talk with both my former teachers and others. My wife just finnished a book she was working on with one of the Intrnists we became friends with in Anderson! I was an FMG. and I started with less experience and confidence than my american trained peers, I was given the help and responsibility I needed to do well and was no different from my peers in 2nd and 3rd year. I also helped to work with FMGs that came after me. Anderson generally has 2 to 4 FMGs in a class of 9. The docs in the community are diverse from many backgrounds so there is no sense of being different as an FMG. I was married with a small child in residency - my life outside of work was doing fun things with them. We did a lot of hiking in the hills nearby to find waterfalls with our dogs. Anderson is a small city with the basic restaurants and little city life - Clemson university is nearby if you want a younger crowd. Anderson is family friendly. My class of nine residents had 1 marriage and 3 babies during the residency plus a bunch of children people brought with them. cost of living is great! I owned an old 3 bedroom house with an acre yard walking distance from the old hospital. I sold it and made a small profit after 3 years. I was able to have this and support my family on just my resident salary so my wife could stay home with our new baby. A friend of mine made a huge profit on his house near the new hospital. This area was not hit as bad as the rest of the country by the real estate problems.

Conclusion

What stand out? Good education family friendly atmosphere easy financial situation. Drawbacks? Does not have the variety and benefits of a bid city - somewhat rural Also they built a new hospital in my second and 3rd year so by the end I was doing some things in one hospital and some things in another 10 minutes away. This will go on for another 5 to 10 years. It made some logistics a little more difficult. Prepared? I'm writing this review because after being out for one year to train in prev med I have talked about residency with a number of other recent graduates and I am impressed by how much better my experience was and how much opportunity I had to learn without too much nonsense. I would easily choose this program again - it was one of the best decisions I ever made and I highly recomend it to others. Most graduates go directly into practice one a year seem to be headed for the military. I went on to Preventive Medicine. sure feel free to contact me if you wish about this.


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10 of 42 people found the following review helpful:

Intern Overall Rating: 26-Aug- 2004
Teaching: Atmosphere: Research:

Schedule

The schedule is dependent on the rotation. On Medicine Service, you admit five patients per call night. The patient population comes from unassigned patients in the community, plus "private" patients of a few select attendings (usually Medicare patients). Some months, you will be able to discharge all five patients before your next call night. Other months, the patients will be sicker and you will carry over onto your next call night. However, the census is seldom if ever unmanageable. The residents are pretty helpful--if you're swamped, and another resident has just one patient, that resident will often help you with some of yours. Even my first month of internship, I was getting to the hospital about 6 AM and able to see most all of my patients by rounds at 9.
OB rounds are at 8, but you usually only have 3-4 post-partum patients at a time. Patient load comes from the Family Medicine Clinic and from the Women's Health Clinic (WHC is predominately lower-income). Call is q3 for the first month, which is good for getting your numbers up. I got 8 deliveries my first month; the other two interns got 10-12 each. Usually, if you deliver a patient, you follow them on Postpartum; if you admit a patient but they don't deliver until your call is over, then the next resident on call will cover them on Postpartum. We usually get 1 GYN patient every few call nights, but they are usually uncomplicated. The FP attendings are great; the OB-GYNs who do our sections are also wonderful to work with (even if you call and wake them up at 3 AM for an arrest of descent!).
Peds rounds are at 8, also. Most of the patients are well newborns, but you do have a couple sick inpatients (number depends on the season!). Again, the inpatients tend to be from Child Health, but there are a few private attendings who admit to our service. You spend your pre-call afternoon in the Child Health Clinic down the street, which is pretty good.
As an intern, I've had two half-days a week of my own office hours, and see about 4 patients a half-day. The patient load will increase as we get used to the system. We have the Logician EMR in clinic, which is great--much better than the paper charts I used in medical school. The FP inpatient service is separate from the Medicine Service; for FP inpatients, there is an upper-level on call each night who will admit the patient, but you then follow them yourself with one of the FP attendings until they are discharged.
There are very few days that I get home later than 6 PM; most days I am leaving by 5. On post-call days, I go home at 2 PM (after the noon conference from 12:30 to 1:30). On Med Service, it sometimes is hard to get all the work done in a timely manner, so those days go longer.
The workload is manageable. Probably the toughest rotation is Med Service, but even then you are capped at 5 admissions a night. Most nights I got 2-3 hours of sleep, although you still do get cross-cover calls even after you've filled. I think it improves your patient care experience, too. The ER knows that if you get 5 patients early, they have to start calling private docs to admit any more unassigned patients after that, so the ER is less likely to "dump" those patients that don't really need admission.
So far, I have had Medicine, Peds, and OB, so I can't comment on the off-service rotations. However, we do two weeks of Sports Medicine, two weeks of Community Medicine, a month of ER medicine, and a month of Surgery as interns, and I have only heard good things from the folks who have done those rotations.
I did a acting internship here as a 4th year, and really enjoyed it. I did a month on the Medicine Service, and the residents and attendings did a good job of making me feel like part of the team. I strongly recommend that you consider doing an AI here if you are interested in the program.

Teaching

I think that the faculty here is excellent. The faculty diversity is one of the big reasons I chose this program. We have doctors interested in Hospice medicine, Sports Medicine, Dermatology, OB-GYN, Internal Medicine, and Geriatrics, among others. All of the faculty members are very knowledgable and willing to teach, both in structured rounds and in office hours. All of the on-service rounds (OB-GYN, Medicine, Pediatrics) include some teaching during rounds, usually based on something in one of the current patients. There is a noon conference every day with lunch provided, and is usually pretty good. The first few months, we have an "Intern Survival Series" lecture series to help with the transition from medical school to residency. We grade each noon conference, and the faculty are very willing to adapt to our feedback. We also have 1-2 DOs in each class, and are working on getting dually accredited by the American Osteopathy Association to offer a DO residency. Having these DO physicians helps the MDs by introducing us to OMT. One of our faculty members is a MD who does a lot of manipulative medicine, and the Medical Director of the hospital is a DO who graduated from our program several years ago.

Atmosphere

One of the big reasons I chose Anderson was that the residents made me feel like part of the family when I came as a medical student. Whereas some programs put on a nice facade, but you later realize that the residents were just trying to woo you, Anderson showed me what they were like when I was interviewing, warts and all. As with any group of 30 people, there can be personality clashes, but for the most part we get along wonderfully. We have (voluntary) get-togethers at least once a month at the house of someone who is off-service, and there are a few churches that have several residents as members. (One of the things I liked about the residents in the program were that there were a lot of residents who went to church, but they weren't all going to the same church, and they didn't discriminate against those who were of other faiths.) We are currently renovating the physical work area. However, we do have two suites of exam rooms which are spacious, and plenty of computer work stations for you to use in clinic. We are developing a resident lounge in the FP center, and we have a resident lounge in the hospial that is well-stocked with snacks and soft drinks. Anderson usually has 2 FMGs in each class. However, these residents are not the stereotypical "couldn't get into a US school" FMGs--they are usually Middle-Eastern or European natives who have chosen to come to the US for residency and practice. In terms of their training and expertise, they are as competitive as other residents in the state.

Conclusion

I was attracted to the Anderson program by the quality of the education, the managable workload which allows you to learn without being too overwhelmed, and the welcoming, diverse resident population. Drawbacks of the program are an aging Family Medicine Center (which is under renovation, so this is improving) and some uncertainty about responsibilities of the residency when we get a new hospital a few miles down the road. However, both of these "negatives" are being worked on. I think that I will be more than adequately prepared to practice both inpatient and outpatient medicine on adults, children, and pregnant patients after I graduate. The opportunities for procedures are out there if you are willing to ask--even most of the non-faculty hospital staff physicians will be willing to let you jump in on procedures. I would definitely apply to this program again if I had to go through the Match a second time. If anyone has questions, they should feel free to contact me.


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7 of 37 people found the following review helpful:

PGY2 Overall Rating: 12-Aug- 2004
Teaching: Atmosphere: Research:

Schedule

The typical day varies depending on the rotation. There are three "on service" rotations OB, PEDS, Medicine. On PEDS and OB the day is generally 8:00 am.-5:00 pm. Of course, it depends on how many patients you have to see before rounds(generally 1-4), which are 8:00 am for OB and 8:00-8;30 am depending on the attending for PEDS. Medicine Service is a little more demanding and is patient dependant( i.e. if you have ICU or CCU pts). Typically, you pre-round on patients and then round with medicine team at 9:00 am. the day ends when the work is done, which is usually between 5-6 pm. Call schedule is q 4 for Medicine Service with a cap of 5 admission as well as handling cross cover calls from the floor. Call for PEDS is q 4. Pts are admitted from the ER, to newborn nursery from labor & delivery as well as from Children's Health Center. Call for OB is q 3, for the first 3 blocks, this is not as bad as it sounds, and then q4 after that. Monthly deliveries average 15 per block. The workload is not bad at all. There 3 blocks of OB in the first year and then by elective in the 2nd and 3rd year for those wishing to do more work in OB. There are 3-4 off service blocks in the 1st year in which there is no call. In the 2nd and 3rd year there are more off service blocks in which upper level residents take home call for the Family Practice Center.(Avgs. 3/block) Scutwork is practically nonexisitent, you can do as much or as little as you want. There are plently of opportunities for procedures. In addition to the hospital duties, you have offices hours in the clinic 2 half days/week in first year, 3/week in 2nd, and 4/week in 3rd. So, to sum it all up. The work is very managable. The hours range from 40/week on off service months to 80 on medicine service(this is including call). Generally, you have the afternoon postcall off.

Teaching

The faculty and the teaching here are outstanding. Have Family Practice physicians that have special interest and /or certifications in Geriatrics, Sports Medicine, OB/GYN, Hospice and Palliative Medicine as well as Addiction Medicine. In addition we have 6 Peditricians on faculty and 4 internists. There are many other clinical faculty with which we work that are also excellent teachers. There is no shortage of physicians willing to teach in every specialty from infectious disease to GI to surgery(yes, even the surgeons are fun to work with). As for didactic sessions, ther is noon conference daily. In additionto these, there are county medical society meetings, and grand rounds/case of the month. One thing that I think sets our conferences apart from others is our intern survival series that has been put together to give new interns essential knowledge needed in the first months of residency. This is also to give the interns a level of comfort that they are not left out on a limb. These conferences are given during the first 3 months of the internship year and consist of Management of Acute MI/Coronary Syndrome to Fetal Monitoring on L&D to procedures like circumcision and colposcopy.

Atmosphere

Resident life is good. There is time for family, and special interests. Of course, as in all residencies that time increases as you move up the chain. However, having a wife and child, I have had ample time to be with them. Residents get together for ball games and cookouts. There is also a residency softball team and a group that attend a local trivia night at a local restaurant. There are opportunities for just about any activity. Our program is within 2 hours of Atlanta, Charlotte, N.C.(maybe 2 1/2),and the mountains. The beach is a little further be reachable in 4 hours or so.

Conclusion

Overall, this is an oustanding residency program. It was my first choice and would be so if I had to go back through the application process. The area that is not very active is research. With that said, however, as a third year a research project is required(not high stress though) and our hospital has been active in multicenter trials for many years. A big plus are the clinics we have for learning. In addition to our Family Practice Center, we have a very active Children's and Women's Health Center where we see lots of PEDS and OB patients. There is also a local Free Clinic which has proven to be an excellant learning experience. We are and unopposed residency, which for Family Practice has been important for two reasons: 1. Here we are Drs. not Residents in the eyes of the nurses and support staff. and 2. It allows for the fullest learning opportunities I have specialists willing to teach me rather than having to fight other residents and fellows for those opportunities. In short, all Family Medicine Residencies have to teach the same things in order to be accredited but how they do it differs greatly. So, if you are looking for a place where you can learn your choosen craft extremely well and have fun doing it then Anderson Family Practice is the place for you. Give us a look, you won't regret it.


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4 of 35 people found the following review helpful:

Intern Overall Rating: 15-Aug- 2002
Teaching: Atmosphere: Research:

Schedule

The typical day, of couse, varies greatly with the rotation. For medicine service, rounds usually begin around 9AM and last anywhere from 1-2 hours on average. The day is over usually around 5PM. OB and Peds services are similar in duration. There is a lunch conference almost every day (lunch provided). Medicine service calls are usually busy (up to 5 admissions per night max. plus cross-coverage). OB and Peds calls less so. Medicine service and Peds residents on-call cover all codes in hospital. Medicine service and peds call q4 days, OB service call q3 days. OB service call is over the morning following call. Residents average about 15 deliveries per month on OB service (3 months during PGY-1) with the opportunity to do more if desired during PGY-2 & 3. FP patients are admitted by their assigned resident during the day and an on-call FP back-up resident at night. Residents admit/follow pts to the ICU. The resident will follow the patient throughout their hospitalization. Scutwork?? What scutwork? The nursing staff is excellent and well experienced, and the hospital and clinic computer systems ensure little legwork.

Teaching

The faculty are all eager to teach and very accessible. Didactic sessions and conferences are noon M-F, 1 hour Tuesday mornings, and an occasional Thursday morning (Grand rounds/case of the month). This is an UNOPPOSED program, and almost all physicians working at the hospital strive to teach residents.

Atmosphere

The camaraderie between my fellow interns is outstanding, despite having a diverse group of colleages. We are very supportive and strive to get together outside of the hospital on a regular basis. The upper-level residents are also very eager to teach and help the interns along. Faculty take time to get to know the residents and provide a nurturing environment to learn (no screaming attendings here!). The hospital is state-of-the-art with 24 hr. CT & MRI, a mobile PET scanner. The hospital has an ICU, CCU, and Neuro ICU (no neonatal ICU or pediatric ICU). CABG is done here on a near-daily basis.

Conclusion

Anderson FPR is an unopposed residency, and as such there are plenty of opportunities to take care of seriously ill patients and do procedures. Residents stay busy, but it is always manageable; and help is nearby whenever needed. I am pleased to be working here, really enjoy the community, and am thrilled with my colleages. I would definitely choose this program again.


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11 of 44 people found the following review helpful:

Medical Student (Outside Rotation) Overall Rating: 22-Apr- 2002
Teaching: Atmosphere: Research:

Schedule

I completed the Religion and Medicine rotation with Anderson's program. I learned how to relate to my patients and incorporate my faith into patient care. The workload was not bad at all. Anderson encourages their residents to pursue outside interests - especially spending time with family. I did no scutwork. I loved it!

Teaching

The faculty is dedicated to teaching residents AND students. I received the best Sports Medicine lecture I have ever heard at this program. Noon conferences were always interesting and food was always provided. Faculty encourages questions and their office doors are ALWAYS open. I felt welcome in every activity at the practice.

Atmosphere

I was impressed that the residents are treated as partners in the practice. Questions are encouraged. It seemed to me that faculty and residents enjoyed learning from each other in a two-way relationship. The residents seemed very happy and not extremely exhausted as I have seen in other programs. The hospital is a community hospital with state of the art facilities.

Conclusion

This program stands out in it's commitment to quality resident teaching in balance with quality life for their residents. I felt so drawn to this program that I ranked them number one. I realized I would feel very prepared once I finished residency. I would love other applicants to contact me. I encourage students to complete a rotation in Anderson. I believe you will love it too!


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